Posts Tagged ‘Entremets’

The Anatomy of an Entremet – Part 3

August 28, 2008

Now, onto the final part of my three part series of making the Intense. Today, we will make the masking ganache, chocolate glaçage and unmould, mask, and glaze the entremet.

Masking Ganache
The masking ganache is an important step to properly shape the entremet and to add some structure to the soft chocolate mousse. You’ll have excess ganache left over after masking the Intense and this can be frozen or refrigerated for future use with other chocolate entremets.

250g Couverture chocolate (55% or higher couverture chocolate)
250g Heavy cream
25g Liquid glucose

– Chop chocolate and place in a mixing bowl.
– Heat heavy cream together with glucose in a small saucepan until it starts to boil. Pull off heat and pour over chocolate. Let sit for 2-3 minutes.
– Mix to form a ganache.
– Set aside to cool

Chocolate Glaçage
This glaçage is a fondant glaze that is very versatile (can be used to glaze chocolate entremet and chocolate éclairs as well).   You‘ll make more than you need for one entremet and you can store the balance for future use.

250g Couverture chocolate (55% or higher couverture chocolate)
260g Pâte à Glacer (or any good quality compound chocolate)
90g Simple syrup (50% sugar + 50% water)
200g Evaporated milk
100g Liquid glucose

– Chop bittersweet chocolate and Pâte à Glacer and put into a mixing bowl.
– In a saucepan, heat the simple syrup, evaporated milk, and liquid glucose together. Bring to boil.
– Pour boiled liquid to chopped chocolate. Let sit for 2-3 minutes.
– Mix to form a ganache.
– Set aside to cool.

Unmoulding the Entremet
– Take the entremet out of the freezer. You should be able to push the entremet out from the ring mould. If you are having trouble pushing the cake out of the ring, take a small paring knife and slide it between the acetate sheet and caking ring and run the knife around the ring to release the entremet. Once released, either wrap the entremet in cling wrap for storage or if you plan on finishing the Intense immediately, just place the entremet back in the freezer while you prep the masking ganache and glaçage.
– Cut out a 16cm diameter round thin cardboard sheet and wrap it with aluminum foil. This sheet will act as the cardboard base for your entremet.

Masking the Entremet
– Heat the masking ganache to around 30-35 degrees Celsius. The ganache should flow loosely as you lift it up with your mixing spoon. Be careful not to mix too much or else you will incorporate air bubbles into the ganache. Incorporating air bubbles into your ganache will mar the final finish of your entremet.
– Place a baking sheet on the table and put a cup in the middle of the baking sheet.
– Take out the entremet from the freezer, remove the acetate strips, and place the cardboard base under the cake.
– Center the frozen entremet on top of the cup.
– Working quickly, pour the masking ganache over the frozen entremet until it is fully covered. Immediately take an offset spatula and push any excess ganache off the top of the entremet. The excess ganache that you push off the top will flow to the sides of the entremet and will fall to the baking sheet below. If you don’t perform this step, you will have a rounded thick top rather than a flat thin top and a flat thin top is what you want.
– Lift the entremet off of the cup with your hands. With a small spatula, clear off any excess ganache off the bottom of the entremet.
– Place masked entremet back to the freezer to set.

Glazing the Entremet
– Heat glaçage to around 30-35 degrees Celsius. The glaçage should flow loosely as you lift it up with your mixing spoon. Be careful not to mix too much or else you will incorporate air bubbles into the glaçage. Incorporating air bubbles into your glaçage will mar the final finish of your entremet.
– Place a baking sheet on the table and put a cup in the middle of the baking sheet.
– Take out the masked entremet from the freezer.
– Center the frozen entremet on top of the cup.
– Working quickly, pour the glaçage over the frozen entremet until it is fully covered. Immediately take an offset spatula and push any excess ganache off the top of the entremet. The excess glaçage that you push off the top will flow to the sides of the entremet and will fall to the baking sheet below. If you don’t perform this step, you will have a rounded thick top rather than a flat thin top and a flat thin top is what you want.
– Lift the entremet off of the cup with your hands. With a small spatula, clear off any excess glaçage off the bottom of the entremet.
– Place glazed entremet back the freezer to set.

When you are ready to serve the Intense, take it from the freezer and place in the refrigerator to thaw overnight. You can be creative in how you decorate this entremet. A piece of nougatine can be placed on top as a decorative piece (as shown in the photo in part one of this series) or you can serve it unadorned without any decorations.

If masking and glazing is too difficult to do, you can simply serve this entremet without these two steps and still enjoy it as is. Masking and glazing does require a certain level of skill that many home bakers may have trouble performing without proper supervision. Unfortunately, I do not have any photos describing these steps in detail (I am a very poor photographer if you haven’t noticed by now!) and I hope this will not deter you from making this fabulous cake.

As a side note, the glazing steps I’ve described above is not how the Intense was finished at Fauchon as shown in the photo in the first part of this series. The Intense in that photo was masked and sprayed with liquid chocolate rather than covered with glaçage. I’ve purposely changed the recipe to reflect the fact that spraying chocolate is very much outside the domain of a home baker and making a glaçage is more practical for the non-professional.

I hope you enjoy making this as much as I have enjoyed eating it!  Good luck!